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Traditional woodcarvings on display at Newa Chen (kp 26/03/2017)

Nature art fest kicks off in Nawalparasi (kp 21/03/2017)

Art and liberal education: Those organising big art events and those struggling to pursue art education deserve kudos, by Abhi Subedi (kp 19/03/2017)

The Man Who Cares About Detail, by Sophia L. Pande (kp 19/03/2017)

Kathmandu Triennale starts with artist presentations (kp 12/03/2017), Kathmandu triennale to celebrate the city (kp 21/03/2017), Artavaganza: The Kathmandu Triennale puts Nepal and Nepali artists on the world map with a two-week festival of creativity, by Smriti Basnet (nt 24/03/2017), Kathmandu Triennale 2017: The person in a woman; Reflections on Aamaa—an experience of womanhood across generations—slated to be performed at Kathmandu’s biggest art jamboree, by Irina Giri (kp 25/03/2017), Nepal’s largest art fest kicks off: Spread over eight venues in the Capital, Kathmandu Triennale will include works by 70 artists from 26 different countries (kp 26/03/2017)

Grief on canvas: Rabindra Shrestha’s solo  exhibition of fingerprint-art and paintings draw on anguish of people in disaster-hit and war-torn areas (kp 12/03/2017)

Nepal’s bird family: Hira Dangol has got his whole clan to blend art with ornithology, by Smriti Basnet (ht 03/02/2017)

Feminism through art: Artist Meena Kayastha’s Divine Debris draws on her personal experience as a woman growing up in Nepal watching other female figures around her struggle with the limits imposed upon them, by Sophia L. Pande (kp 08/01/2017)

Joint painting exhibit at Newa Chen, by Samikshya Bhattarai (kp 30/12/2016)

Artists and their cities: On creating and dying, departing and returning, leaving and arriving, by Niranjan Kunwar (kp 24/12/2016)

Cultural Memory Transformed: Divine Debris is significant that not only because the artist has taken an esoteric, oral tradition and made it public; she has also made visible a form that has almost always remained invisible, by Kurchi Dasgupta (kp 04/12/2016)

Anxiety and originality in art: In Nepal, it is difficult to theorise the question of patronage and legacy in arts, by Abhi Subedi (kp 27/11/2016)

High on art: Gokyo Village, perched on a pristine, enchanting lake, now has another surprise for travellers: The world’s highestart gallery , by Anuj Adhikari (kp 29/10/2016)

The root of things: Sculptor Narendra Prasad Shrestha’s solo exhibition, Dristikon, is a manifesto of a life devoted to arts, by Timothy Aryal (kp 21/09/2016)

The persistence of memory: Five contemporary artists from Kathmandu explore memory and loss in Dolakha’s Gairimudi, by Pranaya SJB Rana (kp 03/09/2016)

Taking art out in the open: The shift in setting of Kathmandu’s arts from private to public spaces could be a catalyst for change, by Smriti Basnet (nt 02/09/2016)

When Words Fail: Using art as a catalyst for healing in a society that continues to stigmatise mental health issues, by Sujan G. Amatya (kp 06/08/2016)

Women in Thangka painting, by Priyanka Gurung (rep 29/07/2016)

Sharada Chitrakar’s odyssey: I was simply struck by the Chitrakar tradition of not giving their daughters the family art education, by Abhi Subedi (kp 24/07/2016)

A world through paubha: Samundra Man Shrestha’s collection of paintings is currently on display at Nepal Art Council, by Rea S. Mishra (kp 31/05/2016)

Time travel through portraits: At the Patan Museum, with images from a bygone era, Nepal Picture Library is creating a portal to a time when a photographic revolution was taking seed, by Sujan G Amatya (kp 14/05/2016)

Art in the open: The Book Bus revisits Gorkha with tales, memories and art in tow, by Pranab Man Singh (kp 07/05/2016)

Pasa Pi: Artists for the people; Art in its highest ideal can reflect society back on itself, and artists, then, act as public servants, by Mark Harris (kp 07/05/2016)

Anthropomorphism and mythology: Artworks that compel the audience to contemplate human attributes from a fresh new transgenic perspective, by Smriti Basnet (nt 06/05/2016)

Art of friendship: The Mithila painting not only evoked a sense of acceptance of police, but also conveyed a message of goodwill, by Ayush Joshi and Bijay Jha (rep 04/05/2016)

From the streets, into the gallery: At the low-brow mix-media exhibition, currently on at the Siddartha Art Gallery, you see two very young artists trying to find a voice that they can stick with, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 30/04/2016)

Art and the earthquake: Where does art come in during a natural disaster when there are so many other needs to meet?, by Sophia L. Pandé (kp 23/04/2016)

The solace of art: The current exhibition at Siddhartha Art Gallery depicts a wide range of emotional responses to the April earthquakes, by Sophia L. Pandé (kp 27/03/2016)

Reclaiming possibilities: Introducing arts education to a marginalised school community in Rasuwa, by Niranjan Kunwar (kp 19/03/2016)

Building an art movement: For contemporary art in Kathmandu to truly become exciting, artists must not expect formal institutions to lead the way, by Mark Harris (kp 19/03/2016)

The Giving Tree: The Kalpavriksha in the Mithila Cosmos, by Sophia L. Pandé (kp 20/02/2016)

The Mithila avatar: In 'Kalpavriksha', S C Suman implores us to imagine a more harmonious future for Nepal, by Michael Nishimura (nt 12/02/2016)

Artists transforming Taltalaiya into a sculpture museum, by Amar Khadka (rep 06/02/2016)

Subedi’s solo sculpture exhibition kicks off (kp 24/01/2016)

The Gods are still leaving: Despite their theft finding national and international limelight, antiques from Nepal remain vulnerable as ever, by Sewa Bhattarai (kp 09/01/2016)

Power of paintingsZhao Jianqui’s works are brilliant examples of the Chinese ink wash technique, by Abhi Subedi (kp 18/10/2015)

Nepal in ink and brush: A Chinese artist’s creative journey across the Himalaya, by Justin Zhao (nt 02/10/2015)

History on canvas: If you have time to see very few art exhibitions in Kathmandu this week then this selection of paintings by Hari Prasad Sharma should be it, by Nischhal Pradhan (nt 02/10/2015)

Rebuilding through art: The efforts of an artist collective in the aftermath of the Great Quake have left a lasting
mark on the affected people of Thulo Byasi
, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 18/07/2015)

Writing about art, by Sophia Pande (kp 12/07/2015)

Art for therapy, by Niranjan Kunwar (kp 11/07/2015)

NAFA-Sumeru exhibition focuses on local artisans’ skill at traditional work  (ht 05/07/2015)

Rising from the ruins, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 04/07/2015)

Bridging the gap: The number of people who write about art in Nepal has increased—there is so much more than art-critic rant to read now. But has art writing actually seen development in quality?, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 20/06/2015)

Murals of hope: After the earthquake, street artists coloured Kathmandu’s walls with messages of hope, by Stéphane Huët (nt 19/06/2015)

A natural performance: After the quake, the tedious repetition of the same old things will not work anymore in art, by Abhi Subedi (kp 14/06/2015)

Getting art out there, by Sophia Pandey (kp 14/06/2015)

Of tragedy, experience and the arts: In addition to relief funds, the wide domain of art can help significantly in restoring normalcy, by Deepesh Paudel (kp 17/05/2015)

Remembering the stolen gods, by Rachana Chettri (kp 25/04/2015)

Hair strands and dark voids: Saurganga Darshandhari and Surendra Maharjan, two printmakers who were handed The Australian Himalayan Foundation Art Award last year, are currently exhibiting their works at the Siddhartha Art Gallery in Babermahal, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 18/04/2015)

Enabling art: Artists best express themselves through their work and then it is the curator’s job to take their art to the public, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 28/02/2015)

Welcome to the machine: Performances by the Nepali artists are what the Nepali public is most used to viewing, and
because they deal with issues that are close to home, they are much easier to access
, by Rachana Chettri (kp 28/02/2015)

Outing evil: Artworks such as Rape Me are meant to shock us out of our slumber and they force us to take a deep look at our social evils, by Kashish Das Shrestha (kp 31/01/2015)

Between heaven and earth, by Rachana Chettri (kp 17/01/2015)

How printmaking in Nepal could change, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 10/01/2015)

Journeying for art: Gurung’s approach reflects a sensibility that should be welcomed in contemporary Nepali visual culture (nt 09/01/2015)

Paving the way of diplomacy through art (kp 08/01/2015)

An Artist’s Journey, by Sophia Pande (kp 07/12/2014)

Blending art and technology (ht 16/11/2014)

Traditional thangka schools create healthy jobs for women, by Anup Ojha (kp 07/11/2014)

Artist as contemporary: In Nepal, we insist on defining contemporary art as mere reinstatements of existing values or reiteration of global idioms, by Kurchi Dasgupta (kp 24/10/2014)

Accessible art and the importance of looking, by Sophia Pande (kp 19/10/2014)

Nepal and Nepalis through paint, by Bivek Thapa (kp 24/09/2014)

A master of the old ways: Lok Chitrakar still prepares his own paint through natural pigments and uses locally available cotton as canvas, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 06/09/2014)

Art exhibition on Mustang (kp 20/08/2014)

Written in stone: Padam Bahadur Tamang has started on a clean slate by reviving an age-old art form, by Sarthak Karki (kp 15/08/2014)

Through the lens again, by Nhooja Tuladhar (kp 05/07/2014)

Representing the real: Art events like the KIAF can do more to support artists who work on current themesthat are relevant to their places of provenance, by Kurchi Dashupta (kp 05/07/2014)

Speaking stones: Nepali sculptures are arresting, powerful spatial manifestations of art that evoke time and emotion, by Abhi Subedi (kp 01/06/2014)

Art and this man, by Sangita Shrestha (kp 02/02/2014) [on Narottam Das Shrestha]

Journeys in art and life (kp 19/01/2014)

Her many facets: Artist Promina Shrestha ably captures life and movement in her quirky, whimsical and often surreal works, by Rachana Chettri (kp 04/01/2014)



Fine Art Nepal (FAN)

Asian Art: The Tharu of the Tarai

Art of Newar Buddhism

Patan Museum
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